Tools for Student-Centered Coaching

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1) Results-Based Coaching Tool

There is an increased sense of urgency permeating our schools. We simply don’t have time to waste in providing students with high-quality learning experiences. As coaches, we also have to operate with this same sense of urgency. That’s why we advocate for coaches to develop systems for measuring how their work is impacting student and teacher learning. We use the Results-Based Coaching Tool (RBCT) to get there.

Template: Results-Based Coaching Tool

For more information:

  • Watch this video to learn how to use the Results-Based Coaching Tool
  • Read chapter 3 in The Essential Guide for Student-Centered Coaching (Sweeney and Harris)

2) Coaching Logs that Align with the Results-Based Coaching Tool

The Results-Based Coaching Tool provides an overview of what occurred across a coaching cycle, including the impact on teaching practice and student learning. The coaching logs that are included here are designed to provide a coach with a place to capture what occurs within each coaching session. They also serve to scaffold both the language and process for a coaching cycle. 

Logs for Coaching Cycles (aligned with the Results-Based Coaching Tool)

For more information:

  • Read chapter 3 in The Essential Guide for Student-Centered Coaching (Sweeney and Harris)

3) Partnership Agreement for Coaching Logs

To get our coaching cycles off on the right foot, we must be in agreement about our mutual expectations for the work. This can be accomplished by using partnership agreements to set norms with teachers at the beginning of a coaching cycle. 

Partnership Agreement for a Coaching Cycle

For more information:

  • Read chapter 3 in Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves (Sweeney and Harris)

4) Checklist for Getting Coaching Cycles Up and Running

This handy checklist will get you started with both your principal and teachers. Use it to make sure that you are defining the coach’s role while also building towards coaching cycles.

Checklist for Getting Coaching Cycles Up and Running

For more information:

  •  Read chapter 2 from The Essential Guide for Student-Centered Coaching (Sweeney and Harris)

5) Grid for Noticing and Naming

This grid serves as a note catcher for when a coach is in a classroom working alongside a teacher. It keeps the focus on student learning. It also provides anecdotal data that can be readily used during planning sessions.

Grid for Noticing and Naming

For more information:

  • Read chapter 4 in Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves (Sweeney and Harris)

6) Co-Planning Tools

We recommend keeping it simple when it comes to co-planning tools. The Planner for Sharing Lessons is designed to help a coach and teacher map out the main components of a lesson, as well as to determine how the teaching will be shared. The Four Square Planner is useful if a coach and teacher are interested in sorting student evidence and then co-planning a differentiated lesson. 

Planner for Sharing Lessons

Four Square Planner

For more information:

  • Read chapter 5 in Student-Centered Coaching: The Moves (Sweeney and Harris)

7) Log for Mini Coaching Cycles

The following log for mini coaching cycles is a place to capture what took place across the lesson(s) that are co-planned and co-taught with the teacher. It’s important to note that we don’t use the Results-Based Coaching Tool to measure mini cycles as they are too narrow in focus and short in duration. 

Log for Mini Coaching Cycles

For more information:

  • Read chapter 2 in The Essential Guide for Student-Centered Coaching (Sweeney and Harris)
  • Read this blog on mini coaching cycles

If you’d like to learn more about implementing Student-Centered Coaching in your district, please contact us at info@dianesweeney.com.